Tiffany and Co. is Founded, 1837

Tiffany and Co. sign in the iconic “Tiffany Blue.”

On September 18, 1837, Tiffany and Company was founded by Charles Lewis Tiffany and John B. Young in New York City as a “stationery and fancy goods” store. These “fancy goods” include fine diamond jewelry for which the company is best known.

Tiffany and Co. quickly became known for its simple, nature-inspired designs, but gained global fame  in 1867 after winning the grand prize in silver craftsmanship at the World’s Fair.

After winning numerous other awards, Tiffany’s became the jeweler of European royalty as well as the Tsar of Russia and the Ottoman Emperor. Abraham Lincoln bought his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, a seed pearl suite from Tiffany and Co. But that’s not the only Tiffany’s that’s been in the White House; Eleanor Roosevelt and Jacqueline Kennedy are two other First Ladies who couldn’t get enough blue boxes.

I thought it would be hard to find a picture of Mary Todd Lincoln in the seed pearl suite, but she is literally wearing them in almost every picture. Good job, Abe.

Fictional characters love Tiffany’s too! In Truman Capote’s classic book-turned-movie, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, protagonist Holly Golightly adores the flagship store and considers it an oasis.

Audrey Hepburn (as Holly Golightly) eating breakfast at Tiffany’s.

 

Well, when I get [the mean reds] the only thing that does any good is to jump in a cab and go to Tiffany’s. Calms me down right away. The quietness and the proud look of it; nothing very bad could happen to you there.

Holly Golightly, Breakfast at Tiffany’s

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