The Assassination of JFK, 1963

On November 22, 1963, America’s beloved 35th president, John F. Kennedy, was assassinated in Dallas, Texas during a presidential motorcade at Dealey Plaza.

John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy in Dallas motorcade.

The afternoon of the assassination, Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested for the murder of Dallas police officer J.D. Tippit, and was also held in custody for the assassination of Kennedy. However, he was never tried in court because nightclub owner Jack Ruby murdered Oswald as he was being transferred from police headquarters to the county jail. After a ten-month investigation, the Warren Commission concluded that Kennedy was assassinated by Oswald who acted alone.

That is all anyone knows for sure. Countless conspiracy theories surround the assassination of JFK, most claiming that Oswald did not assassinate the president, or that he did not act alone.

Lee Harvey Oswald

None of the above information that I found in my research was new to me. Living near Dallas, I was told about Kennedy’s assassination before I was even old enough to fathom the gravity of the event. I didn’t understand why my grandparents wanted my family to take them to the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza  when they visited from Massachusetts, or why people at the museum were crying. And while I will never fully comprehend the stunned sadness of the nation on November 22, 1963, I’m beginning to understand how devastating the event truly was.

The Kennedy family mourns the death of President John F. Kennedy.

John F. Kennedy was the youngest president, and, unfortunately, the president with the shortest life. No matter how you paint the picture of JFK’s death, it is always a tragic one.

So today, let’s forget about conspiracies, politics, and resentment. Let’s remember our 35th president as the vibrant, patriotic man he was. And let’s give thanks.

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.

John F. Kennedy

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One thought on “The Assassination of JFK, 1963

  1. Pingback: JFK Assassinated, 1963 | History/Herstory

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